"Keep scribbling! Something will happen." Frank McCourt

Friday, July 30, 2010

Summer Learning


Since my month of vacation is ending, I want to share what I have learned this summer about writing.

I have learned:

...if life gets in the way of your writing,  vacation does too. Because your schedule and activities change (when you are on vacation), you must continue to plan your writing time to be productive. If you don't, writing may not happen.

...continued learning is crucial. Along with reading fiction or nonfiction of your choice, to scope out writing styles, you also learn from reading "how to" writing articles. You can do this through books, blogs, and websites. Also, classes on writing are very helpful.

...writers are supportive and happy when other writers are published. Why? It encourages the rest of us. I've only had a few children's stories published (in the late 80's) and remember how exciting it was to get my work in print. That memory also encourages me.

...(with no offense to my dear new laptop) I still love curling up with my old fashioned laptop--my notebook and pen.

What have you learned this summer about writing that you didn't previously know?

18 comments:

  1. I've learned just how quickly writing (or the love of reading) can take over your life if you let it. Plus, I've learned how quickly life gets in the way of my reading. LOL

    Mason
    Thoughts in Progress

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  2. Mason, I agree. If I had my way about it, I would be reading half my day and writing the other. I guess I would have to eat and sleep some, too. :)

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  3. I've learned that stories are all around me, and I'm soaking them all in.

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  4. I love writing the old-fashioned way, too! I always start new projects with a notebook and pencil and write for awhile before eventually heading to the computer. :)

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  5. I simply have learned I can or at least in my mind. I'm a kindergartner in this writing world but I'm enjoying every minute of it.

    Thanks for sharing the wealth.

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  6. I learned that summer goes way too fast so any sort of procrastination can really be a big problem. Of course I knew this from previous summers, but I always seem to forget:)

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  7. All of the above and it's more enjoyable with a cheering section.

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  8. This summer, in my life, (a) two people died, (b) my niece got cancer, (c) I had to help my parent and all their "collectables" move house, (d) my dad ended up in the hospital for a week, (e) and I lived through Hurricane Alex with no water for 2 weeks...

    What did I learn?

    It's amazing how much you can read and feel guilty about not writing.

    But now that I'm back to writing, life seems more normal.

    Great post.

    CD

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  9. I have learned that life, health and runnin' a large busy farm can really put the halt in writing but nothin' can stop my creativity! :o)

    God bless and have a fantastic weekend!

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  10. I've learned to allow myself my vacation time and quit worrying that I'm not writing. :)

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  11. Great insights, JW.

    Even though I'd heard it from others, I learned for myself that you can trust the process.

    Have a wonderful weekend!

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  12. That I should never rush to query. I should use every avenue I can to write the best book I can.

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  13. I've learned that inspiration and time to be creative is hard to come by when I have no time to myself! Maybe when my boys are older...

    Glad you had a good vacation :-)

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  14. I rediscovered the love of writing.

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  15. I couldn't agree more, Teresa! Great insight!
    We share so many thoughts alike.
    Hope you have a wonderful weekend, my dear friend!

    Big hugs!
    B xx

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  16. I've learned that spending a week in the company of other writers and teachers of writing is better than almost anything for inspiration and encouragement.

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  17. I am retired so I have time to use as I please so scheduling is not a problem -- tearing myself away from other activities may be.

    I love the ease of editing and correcting in Word but editing on paper still gives me a better sense of the flow of a story or nonfiction piece.

    I can write anything except short stories without a prompt. With prompts I can write short stories abot almost anything, in different voices, settings, times. The stuff stored in my memory from much, much reading and living is on tap and often surprises me.

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